– Protecting non-Muslim Places of Worship.

(© Zubair Qamar 2013)

Contrary to actions of militants today, Muslims did not go on a mad rampage of massacres against non-Muslims. Not only were they allowed to join Muslim armies, but their places of worship were left intact and unharmed. Dadake quotes Baladhuri regarding a letter sent by Muslims to Najran, a Christian community in southern Arabia:

“Najran and their followers are entitled to the protection of Allah and to the security of Muhammad the Prophet, the Messenger of Allah, which security shall involve their persons, religion, lands, and possessions, including those of them who are absent as well as those who are present, their camels, messengers, and images [amthila, a reference to crosses and icons]. The state they previously held shall not be changed, nor shall any of their religious services or images be changed. No attempt shall be made to turn a bishop, a monk from his office as a monk, nor the sexton of a church from his office.”[1]

Dadake says, “Indeed, such examples are to be found on every major front of the Islamic conquests from Perisa to Egypt and all areas in between.”[2]  He then says,

“Within the region of Syria, we have the example of the companion of the Prophet and commander of Muslims forces Abu `Ubaydah ibn al-Jarrah, who concluded an agreement with the Christian population of Aleppo granting them safety for ‘their lives, their possessions, city wall, churches, homes, and the fort.’ Abu `Ubaydah is said to have concluded similar treaties at Antioch[3], Ma’arrat Masrin[4], Hims[5], Qinnasrin[6], and Ba’labakk.”[7]


[1] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, Origins, vol.1, p.100.

[2] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17.

[3] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, vol. 1, p.227.

[4] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, vol. 1, p.229.

[5] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, vol. 1, p.187.

[6] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, vol. 1, p. 223.

[7] Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Revised and Expanded). Page.17. Dadake cites: Baladhuri, vol. 1, p. 198-199.

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